Book Study of The Month

  • December Book Study of the Month: My Big Feelings by Sidney Hall

    Posted by Litonya Gant on 12/1/2021

    Enjoy these very simple stories that teach hard-to-explain emotions, such as disappointment, that are so challenging for toddlers and preschoolers to control.

     

    Read and Discuss the Book

    • Read the book My Big Feelings.
    • As you read the book discuss the different types of feelings that the characters have in the book.
    • As your child do they ever feel any of the following feelings? 
    • What happens when you feel ______ (insert emotion here). 
    • What do instead when we are feeling disappointed, jealous, or shy?

    Book Activities are located in the back of the book. Give it a try!

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  • November Book Study of the Month: I Need a Hug/Necesito un abrazo by Aaron Blabey

    Posted by Litonya Gant on 11/1/2021

    Poor porcupine! No one will give the prickly (but needy) critter a hug. Not Lou the rabbit, not Ken the deer, not even big bear, Joe. They are all afraid of the green kiss-seeking snake. But porcupine isn’t! Animated, comical illustrations combine with conversation bubbles to tell a very funny, understated, and satisfying story.

     

    READ ALOUD

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quOxSWBSyk8

     

    Read and Discuss the Book

    • Explain that this story is called ‘I need a hug’. When do you need a hug? Agree that usually, it’s when you’ve hurt yourself, or had a bad day, or had an argument with a friend. What else helps you to feel better when you’re upset?

     

    • Look closely at the front cover of the story, and ask your child what they think the problem will be. Does the bear look like he wants to hug the porcupine? What other animals wouldn’t you want to hug? Why? Can you think of any animals that are nice to cuddle?

     

    • Read through the story. Why does the porcupine think the other animals have all changed their minds about hugging him? What is the real reason they were running towards him? How does he feel at the end? Why?
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  • October Book Study of the Month: It's Okay to Make Mistakes by Todd Parr

    Posted by Litonya Gant on 10/1/2021

     It's Okay to Make Mistakes embraces life's happy accidents, the mistakes, and mess-ups that can lead to self-discovery. Todd Parr brings a timely theme to life with his signature bold, kid-friendly illustrations and a passion for making readers feel good about themselves, encouraging them to try new things, experiment, and dare to explore new paths.

     

    READ ALOUD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVnTh1RZyIY

     

    Read and Discuss the Book

    • Read Todd Parr’s picture book, “It’s Okay to Make Mistakes”
    • Talk about the mistakes made by characters in the book
    • Have your child share when they have made a mistake
    • Share with your child when you have made mistakes

    Ask and Discuss the following questions

    • What happens if you give up after you make a mistake?
    • What do you do when you are faced with a difficult task?
    • How do you feel if you make a mistake?
    • What happens when you try something new? What can you do?
    • Do you learn from your mistakes?
    • What can’t you do yet?
    • What can you do to help you learn how to do that thing you can’t do yet?
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  • August/September Book Study of the Month: Be Who You Are by Todd Parr

    Posted by Litonya Gant on 8/23/2021

    Author Todd Parr encourages kids to be proud of who they are inside.Be who you are!Be proud of where you're from.Be a different color. Speak your language.Wear everything you need to be you.

     

    READ ALOUD

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGkXyT5tMas

     

    READ AND DISCUSS THE BOOK

    Be old. Be young. Be a different color.

    • Pause on this page and have your child talk about how we all have different skin colors.

    • Ask them if people are really purple, green, or yellow? (This is a great teachable moment opportunity — your child will often mention toys such as Legos minifigures being yellow, and you can point out that it would be very inclusive if more toymakers made all of their people/minifigures in skin tones that look like real people.)

    • Let your child know that when they draw themselves, you will be providing many beautiful shades of brown for skin tones and that they can also decide if they want to draw like Todd Parr and make their skin tone or hair tone a rainbow color.

    • Ask your child if anything else is missing in the image. (Your child may notice that Todd Parr does not draw noses on people, but he does draw noses on animals,) You may want to encourage your child to draw noses in their self-portraits.

    • Talk to your child about how we all have different colors and textures of hair and that this is one of the many things that makes us beautiful and different.

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  • April Book Study of the Month: Only One You by Linda Kranz

    Posted by Litonya Gant on 4/1/2021 5:00:00 AM

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    Adri’s mama and papa share some of the wisdom they have gained through the years with their eager son. Their words, simple and powerful, are meant to comfort and guide him as he goes about exploring his world.

     

    Read Aloud: https://youtu.be/vu9capmEY5I

     

    During the Story

    As you read the book take a good look at Papa and Mama fish. What do you notice about each fish? What patterns or shapes can you see? Mama has a heart and Papa has a sun pattern. On every page there is one or both of Mama and Papa, so you can keep young children engaged by also searching for Mama and Papa in the illustrations.

     

    Discussion Questions:

    1. What is a friend? What qualities do friends have?

    2. What friends have students made since being in school?

    3. What are some things friends do together?

    4. How can we be friends to other people?

      

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  • March Book Study of the Month: Ruby Finds a Worry

    Posted by Litonya Gant on 3/1/2021 5:00:00 AM

     Ruby

     

    Ruby loves being Ruby. Until, one day, she finds a worry. At first, it's not such a big worry, and that's all right, but then it starts to grow. It gets bigger and bigger every day and it makes Ruby sad. How can Ruby get rid of it and feel like herself again?

    Read Aloud: https://youtu.be/3vPI4gKWDGg

     

    Before Reading

    Connect: During the pandemic, everyone has worries about work or school, health or family. The coronavirus has us all worried. Talk about some of your worries with a safe friend.

    Show: Look at the picture of Ruby with her worry. Talk about how it feels to have a worry that big. Draw a picture of your worries.

    Ask: What do you notice about Ruby’s worry?  (Look at the color choices the illustrator uses.) While listening to the story, think about the ways you are like Ruby and watch for how she handles her worries.

     

    During Reading

    Ask: Pause at the page that reads “Each day it got a little bit bigger.”  How does Ruby feel about her worry?  How can you tell?

    Show: Describe what you notice is happening to the worry.  Where is it? What is its size and color? How does Ruby change? 

    Connect: Ruby tried to ignore her worry. What happens when you pretend you are not worried? 

     

    After Reading

    Show: Go back to the page where Ruby and the boy are on the bench. Describe what you notice about the different worries.

    Ask: What happened when Ruby met the boy? How did she help him? How did talking with him help her manage her worry?

    Connect: Sharing our worries with someone who cares about us is one way to handle our worries.  What are other positive things we can do to handle feelings of worry or stress?

     

    Activities

    1. Talk about what things help you feel better when you have a worry.
    2. Draw a picture of yourself with your worries next to you when you want to do your favorite activities.
    3. Some people have many worries because they have needs. Talk about the difference between needs and wants. Visit a nonprofit in the community that helps address a need that someone might worry about, such as where to get food, where to get supplies for school, what we are doing to the environment. Learn about their work and what you can do. Make a plan to take action.
    4. There are so many great children’s books with similar themes:
      • “Wemberly Worried” by Kevin Henkes
      • “The Dot” by Peter Reynolds
    Other Ideas

    Do these five breathing exercises for kids from Cosmic Yoga

    Comments (-1)
  • February Book Study of the Month: I Like Myself by Karen Beaumont

    Posted by Litonya Gant on 2/1/2021 5:00:00 AM

    Ensemble-Therapy-Bibliotherapy-I-Like-Myself.jpg

    I Like Myself is an entertaining and silly book about a girl who is bursting with self-confidence. Follow the little girl and her wiener dog as they go through the day being themselves!

    Read Aloud: https://youtu.be/3vPI4gKWDGg

    Pre-reading activity:

    Discuss what you see on the cover of the book and ask your little one to predict what the story may be about. 

    During the story:

    Have your little one predict the text based on the illustrations. Provide definitions and connections for any of the target vocabulary words listed below that may be unfamiliar. Ask questions throughout the story to help your child comprehend what’s being read. Have your child repeat unfamiliar words.

    Example Questions:

    • What do you think it means for hair to have a mind of its own?
    • Zuri is proud of her hair. Tell me about a time you felt proud?
    • Zuri says her braids are funky, which means they are super stylish. What’s another meaning for the word funky?
    • What does Zuri put on to make her look like a superhero?
    • What caused Zuri’s hair to go from large to small?
    • Have you ever been so excited you couldn’t sleep?
    • Why did Zuri think it was a good idea to do her hair on her own?
    • How did Zuri feel when her dad’s styles didn’t turn out perfectly?
    • What are some tools used to do your hair?

    Post-reading activity:

    1. How did you feel while reading this book?

    2. The girl in the story shared many things she liked about herself, some were on the outside and some were are the inside. What are some things that you like about yourself?

    3. Sometimes it can feel difficult to be yourself when other people say something hurtful about you. What are things you can do to keep being yourself during those times?

    4. The little girl and her dog are shown having fun in many different places, like waking up at home, seeing the lions at the zoo, and roller skating in the park. Take your child to do something fun this week and talk about how your activities are like the little girl’s activities.
    Comments (-1)
  • January Book Study of the Month: I'm Happy-Sad Today by Lory Britain

    Posted by Litonya Gant on 1/1/2021 5:00:00 AM

    Happy-Sad

     

    I'm Happy-Sad Today is about a little girl who can be happy, and also sad. Excited, but nervous too. Feeling friendly, with a little shyness mixed in. Mixed feelings are natural, but they can be confusing. There are different kinds of happy--the quiet kind and the "noisy, giggly, jump and run" kind. 

     

    Before You Read
    Point to the words as you read aloud the title, the authors, and the illustrator. Then talk about the letters on the cover illustration. 

     

    As You Read

    As you read, ask your child:  

    • Tell me about a time you also felt nervous and excited at once?
    • Have you ever been happy loud or happy quiet before?

     

    After You Read
    Talk about the book with children. Ask questions such as,

    • What feelings do you have when you try something new?
    • Let's name as many feelings as we can?
    • What feelings do you like? What feelings you don't like?

     

    Read Aloud: I'm Happy-Sad Today

    Comments (-1)
  • December Book Study of the Month: Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry

    Posted by Litonya Gant on 12/1/2020 5:00:00 AM

    Hair Love

     

    Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry and Vashti Harrison celebrates natural hair and the relationship between a father and daughter. Whether she’s wearing it in an afro, puffs, or braids, Zuri loves her hair and her dad affirms her beauty. When a special occasion comes around (mommy’s return home), Zuri and her dad need a special hairstyle. After several fails, they turn to a video tutorial to come up with a suitable style.

     

    Read Aloud: https://youtu.be/eCgwAJ6SO1M

    Official Hair Love short Film: https://youtu.be/kNw8V_Fkw28 

     

    Pre-reading activity:

    Discuss what you see on the cover of the book and ask your little one to predict what the story may be about. Have a discussion about your child’s hair and the different styles that can be done. If your child has short hair, you can talk about styles they like on others.

    During the story:

    Have your little one predict the text based on the illustrations. Provide definitions and connections for any of the target vocabulary words listed below that may be unfamiliar. Ask questions throughout the story to help your child comprehend what’s being read. Have your child repeat unfamiliar words.

    Example Questions:

    • What do you think it means for hair to have a mind of its own?
    • Zuri is proud of her hair. Tell me about a time you felt proud?
    • Zuri says her braids are funky, which means they are super stylish. What’s another meaning for the word funky?
    • What does Zuri put on to make her look like a superhero?
    • What caused Zuri’s hair to go from large to small?
    • Have you ever been so excited you couldn’t sleep?
    • Why did Zuri think it was a good idea to do her hair on her own?
    • How did Zuri feel when her dad’s styles didn’t turn out perfectly?
    • What are some tools used to do your hair?

    Target Vocabulary:

    Post-reading activity:

    Have your little one re-read the book in their own words using the illustrations. Discuss a time where you or your child had to get your hair styled in a special way.

     

    Comments (-1)
  • November Book Study of the Month: Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault

    Posted by Litonya Gant on 11/1/2020

    chicka chicka

     

    Chicka Chicka Boom Boom is an enjoyable and refreshing interaction with the alphabet as readers follow upper and lowercase letters in an unexpected journey to the top (and bottom) of a coconut tree.

     

    Before You Read
    Point to the words as you read aloud the title, the authors, and the illustrator. Then talk about the letters on the cover illustration. 

    Open to the end pages of the book and explain that Chicka Chicka Boom Boom is an ABC book or an alphabet book, say, That means it is about the letters of the alphabet.

    • Invite children to recite each letter of the alphabet after you. Then read the story aloud.

    As You Read
    Chicka Chicka Boom Boom has a lively musical rhythm. As you read, emphasize the beat and rhythm of the words. 

    • Invite children to join in when you read the repeating lines “Chicka chicka boom boom” and “Skit skat skoodle doot. Flip flop flee.”
    • Point to each letter as you read its name. Move your finger up the tree when you read the phrases “up the coconut tree” or “to the top of the coconut tree.”

    After You Read
    Talk about the book with children. Ask questions such as,

    • Why do you think the letters of the alphabet run up the coconut tree?
    • What happens when all the letters of the alphabet get to the top of the tree? (They fall down!) Why do you think they fall down?
    • Let’s count the letters in the alphabet. (Count aloud as you point to each letter.) 

     

    Read Aloud: Chicka Chicka Boom Boom

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