• Civics: Civics is a challenging course that is designed to bridge the gap between high school and college level work. The course is designed to prepare students to be active participants in our American governmental and political systems. We will primarily be focusing on the federal government, as opposed to local and state governments. Curriculum for the course centers on a wide array of skills which include the following: critical reading skills, document analysis and interpretation, and analytical/evaluative writing.  Classroom discussions will also require the ability to evaluate and analyze historical information. Topics of the course through the first semester include the principles of government, the Constitution, Federalism, Political Parties, Voting & Elections, Mass Media & Interest Groups, and Congress. The subjects of second semester will include the Presidency, the Bureaucracy, the Judicial system, Civil Liberties & Civil Rights, and Local & State government Our studies this year will not necessarily be chronological, but will cover events from 1776-present.

     

    In addition to the units of study listed above, the course will focus on the following reasoning processes: Comparison, Causation, and Continuity and Change. These processes will be exercised and utilized by the following documents or sources: The Articles of Confederation, The Declaration of Independence, The Constitution, The Bill of Rights, The Federalist Papers, and various Supreme Court Cases. These documents will be exercised by the following skills:  1. Critical Thinking, 2. All 3 Forms of Writing, 3. Document Analysis, 4. Drawing Inferences & Conclusions.

     

    AP World History:

    This is a full year, 1-credit course required for graduation.

     

    AP World History is a challenging course that is designed to be the equivalent of a freshmen college course in a high school setting.  The course is designed to prepare students for the AP Exam in May 2020. Curriculum for the course centers on a wide array of historical skills which include the following: critical reading skills, document analysis and interpretation, and analytical/evaluative writing.  Classroom discussions will also require the ability to evaluate and analyze historical information. Topics of the course through the first semester include the development of Chinese civilization, the creation and rise of Islam, state building in Africa, developments in Europe from 1200-1450, the Byzantine Empire, the expansion of empires and belief systems from 1450-1750, the age of exploration, and more. The subjects of second semester will include the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the rise of nationalism from 1750, the industrial revolution, the rise of imperialism, migration, World War I, World War II, the changing of the global order, globalization, and more. Our studies this year will cover the time period 1200-present.

     

    In addition to the units of study listed above, the course will focus on the following reasoning processes: Comparison, Causation, and Continuity and Change. These processes will be exercised and utilized by the following skills: Developments and Processes, Sourcing and Situation, Claims and Evidence in Sources, Contextualization, Making Connections, and Argumentation. These skills will be used in conjunction with the following thematic learning objectives:  1. Humans and the Environment, 2. Cultural Developments and Interactions, 3. Governance, 4. Economic Systems, 5. Social Interactions and Organization, 6. Technology and Innovation.